Island – an art-video by Alan McCluskey

Island is an art-video made by Alan McCluskey on location in the White house in Veyrier, Switzerland in 1983. Taking part in the video, amongst others, are Betsy, Chatouille, Chen, Christophe, Christiane, Crepo, Derek, Diego, Dorothee, Dutch, Huguette, Ingrid, Joanna, Kira, Jean-François, Kerena, Louise, Maia, Marie-Dan, Mathieu, Shan, Solar Stan and Tox.

Click to see the Island gallery.

Geneva Giants thrill massive crowds

Geneva Giants conjured up by the company Royal de Luxe walk the streets of Geneva for three days. A young giant girl and her giant grandmother – aided by a wealth of lilliputians – strode or rode the streets of Calvin’s City to the wonderment of the gathered crowds. Below, the first video shows the two giants riding through the massed crowds. All videos and photos are mine.

Here’s is a second video in which the girl gets to her feet by the banks of the Geneva Lake having ridden through town on her bicycle. She subsequently squatted down and relieved herself, flooding the road around her, shocking some of the people watching on.

Finally a small gallery of photos taken from amongst the crowd on Sunday, October 1st, 2017. The weather was beautiful and the atmosphere joyful as a crowd of all ages stared on, touched by the humanity of these ‘aliens’.  Click the following photos to see (all) in a larger format.

Video-art photo gallery: La Terre Promise

It’s 1982 and the Falkland War has broken out. Beirut cowers under a deluge of bombs and Palestinians are being slaughtered while in Cannes the great names of modern cinema present their latest films.  Further north, by Lake Geneva, promising fine-arts students listen to filmmakers Johan van des Keuken and Steve Dwoskin, while elsewhere in the city a group of talented young actresses and actors put on a play. Such is the material of my video-art collage, La Terre Promise (The Promised Land). Click to see stills from the recent digital transfer of the video. 

Game – an art video

 

Game, an art video written, directed, filmed and edited by Alan McCluskey, starring the actress Isabelle Maurice. With Laurent Desplands as video technician. Assistants: Edgar Acevedo and Cathy Day. Thanks to Alan &Jasmine Ringger, Marianne Husser, Marie-Carmen, Béatrice, Françoise, Muriel, Elena, Isabelle, Danielle, Nadia and especially the late André Iten. Made in collaboration with MJC St-Gervais, Genève. 1988.

Protect Net Neutrality

Wednesday July 12th 2017 has been singled out in the States and elsewhere as a day of action in favour of Net Neutrality. If the Trump administration through the FCC reverses earlier decisions and gives the right to Internet access providers to pick and chose how they grant access to the Internet it opens the door to partitioning the Net between haves and have-nots, with ultra high-speed broadband services for the rich and pitifully slow Internet, if any access at all, for the poor and marginalised. In terms of content and content providers, it would give access providers the right to decide what is ‘acceptable’ and what is ‘unacceptable’, where acceptability may depend on the company’s commercial or political interests rather than any concern for the public good or for the underlying democratic nature of the Internet. To learn more about the question see (amongst many others);

Untruthful photos

Did it ever strike you how untruthful photos can be. They draw you into a frame and hold your attention captive. They lead you to forget what is beyond the frame both in terms of time and space. In the above photo, you see nothing of the parked cars or the haphazard roofs not to mention the slush on the roads or the dreary people trudging about their day. You don’t know that the wild flurry of snow didn’t last more than five minutes. And why should you? That would spoil the photo.

Photos can ‘lie’ in other ways, by the angle they take on the world. The example I want to use comes from a video, but the dynamic is the same. Imagine the moment. A group of postgrad sociology students are seated around a table watching a video, an extract from a French TV documentary comparing the editorial meetings of two French dailies, the right-wing Le Figaro and the communist L’Humanité,. Le Figaro is filmed such as to always  include several people with the camera at chest height. Shots are chosen in which participants are smiling or expressing their opinion. In comparison, L’Humanité is filmed from much lower down, framing only one person at a time. Images of participants are chosen in which they  look on silent and unsmiling. The postgrads were quick to point out the convivial nature of the Figaro meeting compared to the domineering attitude of the chief editor of Humanité. They quickly moved on to speculate about what that implied. They were quite oblivious to the fact that the impression they took as fact might well have been created by the way the camera was oriented and by the choice of images when editing.

So while we relish in photos that move or inspire or anger us, we need to remember that they invariably only tell a partial, if not slanted tale of reality.

Time for an exhibition

I gave the photo in the picture above to my wife as a Valentine’s present. I find it difficult to look at it without being moved. It’s a photo that tells stories. A lot of my photos are like that. They are not just would-be postcards that grip the world by their teeth and leave you no room to go beyond. They are open doors to stories. In line with my new novel, Stories People Tell, I am beginning to think of organising a new exhibition entitled Stories Photos Tell. Priority at the moment goes to finishing the novel which is reaching its climactic finale, but I have selected a number of possible photos…

Hard times!

The hard life of Swiss gnomes in Winter. See all the snapped gallery

Strange guests

An alpine concert for frozen fish

Strange guests in unusual places. New contributions to the Snapped gallery.