Protect Net Neutrality

Wednesday July 12th 2017 has been singled out in the States and elsewhere as a day of action in favour of Net Neutrality. If the Trump administration through the FCC reverses earlier decisions and gives the right to Internet access providers to pick and chose how they grant access to the Internet it opens the door to partitioning the Net between haves and have-nots, with ultra high-speed broadband services for the rich and pitifully slow Internet, if any access at all, for the poor and marginalised. In terms of content and content providers, it would give access providers the right to decide what is ‘acceptable’ and what is ‘unacceptable’, where acceptability may depend on the company’s commercial or political interests rather than any concern for the public good or for the underlying democratic nature of the Internet. To learn more about the question see (amongst many others);

Untruthful photos

Did it ever strike you how untruthful photos can be. They draw you into a frame and hold your attention captive. They lead you to forget what is beyond the frame both in terms of time and space. In the above photo, you see nothing of the parked cars or the haphazard roofs not to mention the slush on the roads or the dreary people trudging about their day. You don’t know that the wild flurry of snow didn’t last more than five minutes. And why should you? That would spoil the photo.

Photos can ‘lie’ in other ways, by the angle they take on the world. The example I want to use comes from a video, but the dynamic is the same. Imagine the moment. A group of postgrad sociology students are seated around a table watching a video, an extract from a French TV documentary comparing the editorial meetings of two French dailies, the right-wing Le Figaro and the communist L’Humanité,. Le Figaro is filmed such as to always  include several people with the camera at chest height. Shots are chosen in which participants are smiling or expressing their opinion. In comparison, L’Humanité is filmed from much lower down, framing only one person at a time. Images of participants are chosen in which they  look on silent and unsmiling. The postgrads were quick to point out the convivial nature of the Figaro meeting compared to the domineering attitude of the chief editor of Humanité. They quickly moved on to speculate about what that implied. They were quite oblivious to the fact that the impression they took as fact might well have been created by the way the camera was oriented and by the choice of images when editing.

So while we relish in photos that move or inspire or anger us, we need to remember that they invariably only tell a partial, if not slanted tale of reality.

Time for an exhibition

I gave the photo in the picture above to my wife as a Valentine’s present. I find it difficult to look at it without being moved. It’s a photo that tells stories. A lot of my photos are like that. They are not just would-be postcards that grip the world by their teeth and leave you no room to go beyond. They are open doors to stories. In line with my new novel, Stories People Tell, I am beginning to think of organising a new exhibition entitled Stories Photos Tell. Priority at the moment goes to finishing the novel which is reaching its climactic finale, but I have selected a number of possible photos…

Hard times!

The hard life of Swiss gnomes in Winter. See all the snapped gallery

Strange guests

An alpine concert for frozen fish

Strange guests in unusual places. New contributions to the Snapped gallery.

Inauguration at La Chaux de Fonds

Gare Chaux de Fond 3

The inauguration of the Place de la Gare in La Chaux de Fonds took place mid October 2015. It was marked by a display of slides projected onto surrounding buildings accompanied by music. See the gallery for more photos.

Alexander Hahn

Alexander Hahn

I have added several photos to the Art gallery taken at the opening of Alexander Hahn’s exhibition entitled All the World’s a Stage that took place at the Kunstraum Oktogon, Bern on Saturday September 12th. I hadn’t seen Alexander for nearly 25 years when I was in my ‘video’ phase. It was really good to meet up, although a busy opening is not necessarily the best place.

I had a quick look back in the archives and immediately found several articles I wrote about Alexander. Here is one in English from the first and only issue of the bilingual Scope Magazine in which Alexander was the feature video maker. It dates from November 1992. (Click to see full page version of these articles.)

IMG_0784

IMG_0785

And a review in French of his video Dirt Site in Number 19 of the quarterly magazine Gen Lock.

IMG_0760